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Honoring My Home’s History

Honoring My Home’s History

When we moved into our farmhouse, I knew that it was built almost 100 years earlier. Because of it’s age, I decided early on that I wanted to maintain a sense of its history by following traditions that the original owners might have followed.  I decided that honoring my home’s history was important to me since that was the reason we chose this home.

Public Vs. Private Spaces

Houses were built a lot smaller back then.  For example, my living room is only 210 square feet; the kitchen is 114 square feet; and the dining room is 150 square feet.  Because houses were built much more compactly than they are today, the more public rooms (kitchen, dining, and living room) were on the main floor and the more private rooms (bedrooms ) were upstairs.

To keep that separation of public and private rooms like they would have done, I chose to hang and display all our personal family photos upstairs with the thought that in the early 20th Century, any entertaining in our home would have been done in our living room (back then it would have been a parlor) and nothing personal would have been displayed there.

The Turnaround House

I know not everyone will agree with me on this thought process, but it’s my own little way of honoring my home’s history and heritage.  You can read more about our 100 year old farmhouse, The Turnaround House, here,   here, and here.  I also did an earlier blog post about living like Downtown Abbey that you can read here.

What are your thoughts?  Do any of you live in an older house and do this?

 

 

 

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